Snapchat, the mobile app that lets users send “self-destructing” photos, has the distinction of being the only digital tool that does not have a single redeeming feature. While the moral panic associated with blogs, cell phones, social networks and online games has largely faded in grudging recognition of their more positive uses (indeed, research shows that many parents have actually helped their children lie about their age register for Facebook accounts), Snapchat is seen as the Q-tip of the digital age: its sole function is to do the thing that you’re warned not to do on the box.

I’ve already written about YouTube and Instagram, but today I wanted to share some information about four other popular sites and apps that are on my radar right now: Snapchat, Vine, Tumblr and ask.fm.

YouTube is a window into a world of wonder. There is so much great material to be found there, whether it’s for education, entertainment, or inspiration.  But there’s also a lot of inappropriate stuff in amongst the cat videos and Kid President. Question is, how do we, as parents, help our kids safely navigate YouTube?

The issue of copyright is one that many of us probably know a little bit about.  Copying is stealing – and stealing is bad - but it can still be a grey area in a social media world which is very PRO sharing.

Like it or not, if you use the Internet you have an online identity. Some people call this your “brand.” What’s a brand?

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