February 11 is Safer Internet Day (#SID2014), an annual international event organized by InSafe to help promote safer and more responsible use of online technologies, especially by young people.

This week, the Students whom I work with at Golf Road Junior Public School had an amazing opportunity directly related to our work together in studying Media Literacy, specific to Television and Film Media. After being approached by Media Smarts, I was connected with the CBC who wanted to engage with and film a class focused on Students’ perceptions and opinions on Violence within popular films.

Today, Facebook and MediaSmarts would like to announce a new guide for teens, Think Before You Share, that provides tips about sharing and making decisions online.

The CRTC is looking for your input to help reshape the future of the Canadian television system. To add to the ongoing conversation, MediaSmarts and the Canadian Internet Registry Authority (CIRA) are reaching out to Canadian consumers, citizens, and creators to take part in a tweet chat on Thursday, November 28 at 7pm. Join in using the hashtag #talktv and let’s discuss the future of television in Canada!

Every year there is a specialized week called “Media Literacy Week.” Every year there is a new topic which we try to educate others about. This year’s theme is “What’s Being Sold: Helping Kids Make Sense of Marketing & Consumerism Messages.”

When we were approached by the team at MediaSmarts about getting involved in this year’s Media Literacy Week, we immediately jumped at the chance to participate in this important initiative. Why? Because we are in a new era.

The theme of this year’s Media Literacy Week, “What’s Being Sold: Helping Kids Make Sense of Marketing Messages” is one I personally feel strongly about. After all, I’ve spent my entire career working in all aspects of marketing and communications. At the Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA), I’m responsible for the department filled with people who are experts in advertising and communications, social media and public relations.

There has been a lot of discussion in the past couple years among scientists, the public health community and the media about the impact of smoking and tobacco images in movies.

Using social media in the classroom isn’t a complex feat, even though it may seem that way. What I think is a great idea is to instill social media literacy in students by crafting assignments around Twitter, Pinterest or Tumblr, for example. I’ve compiled a list of four tips to help you do just that:

When I finished Grade 11 in June, I reflected on what I had learned in the past school year. I was taught how to solve quadratic equations, the origins of world religions and studied the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Oh and I know the legal requirements of marriage! But there was something I wasn’t taught. Scrolling down my Twitter timeline, it hit me – why was I never taught anything about social media?

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