Cyberbullying tweets from the President of the United States. Sexism in Silicon Valley. Fake news from social media feeds fuelling online hate.

It’s been a rough year so far on the digital media landscape.

Every year on June 21, Canadians recognize the cultures, histories, and ongoing contributions of our First Nations, Inuit, and Métis people. For 20 years, National Aboriginal Day has brought a country-wide focus to Canada’s diverse Indigenous peoples and the issues that they face.

March 8 is designated around the world as International Women’s Day, a day for recognizing women’s achievements, as well as the inequities that women face. This year, the United Nations’ theme is Planet 50-50 by 2030: Step It Up for Gender Equality, focusing on the UN’s 2030 Agenda. The theme for Status of Women Canada – #YouAreEmpowerment – is also about working towards gender equality.

Today is Safer Internet Day 2016(February 9), and the theme is “play your part for a better internet”. To help you play your part, we’d like to share a new tip sheet by and for Canadian youths on how to make the Internet safer and better for everyone.

Be Respectful, Patient and Kind: How Youth are Building a Better World Online

MediaSmarts asked Canadian teens attending a Digital Youth Summit what they do to make the online world better for everyone. Here’s what they said:

It’s Media Literacy Week! This is actually the tenth annual Media Literacy Week, which runs November 2-6. If you’re reading this, it’s likely that you already have a good handle on what media literacy is all about.

To better understand the digital skills young Canadians need as citizens and workers in the digital age, MediaSmarts and the Information and Communications Technology Council (ICTC) are hosting a National Digital Youth Summit to hear directly from Canadian students on this topic.

Toronto parents: do you want to talk to your kids about their social media use but don’t know how? Get an insider look at what young people are doing online and find out what you need to know to help them navigate their digital world.

October is National Cyber Security month and the Information and Communications Council (ICTC) and MediaSmarts, in partnership with Encounters Canada and Hive Toronto, are bringing together industry leaders, compelling speakers, and 200 secondary school students for 2 days of engagement on Digital Literacy, Cyber Citizenship and Cyber Security.

Joe McGinniss’ book The Selling of the President had a shocking title for 1968, suggesting as it did that in the television age the presidency had become nothing more than another product to be packaged and sold. MediaSmarts’ resource, Watching the Elections (a lesson for Grades 8-12), shines a light on how the different aspects of an election – from the debates to political ads to the candidates themselves – are actually media products.

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