Outcome Chart - British Columbia - English Language Arts 5

This outcome chart contains media-related learning outcomes from the British Columbia, Grade 5 English Language Arts curriculum, with links to supporting resources on the MediaSmarts site.

It is expected that students will:

Curricular Competencies

Students will be able to develop the following curricular competencies using oral, written, visual, and digital texts.

Comprehending and Connecting

Develop a variety of reading strategies and critical thinking skills to increase comprehension and construct meaning

Engage actively as readers and listeners to construct meaning and develop thinking and comprehension

Explore a rich variety of texts, including story, to deepen learning and develop a broader understanding of self, family, community, and the world

Appreciate the universal importance of story in Aboriginal and other cultures

Explore the ways language can be manipulated and used for specific purposes and audiences, including to evoke emotional responses

Think critically about ideas and information to deepen, extend, and transform understanding

Consider different perspectives, beliefs and points of view in Aboriginal, Canadian, and other cultural texts

Develop an understanding of how literary elements, devices, and language features enhance meaning

Evaluate the accuracy, reliability, and relevance of information

Support thinking using evidence, personal connections, and background knowledge

MediaSmarts Resources

Behaving Ethically Online: Ethics and Empathy

Comic Book Characters

Comparing Real Families to TV Families

CyberSense and Nonsense: The Second Adventure of the Three CyberPigs

Earth Day: Maps as Media

Girls and Boys on Television

How to Analyze the News

Image Gap

Introducing TV Families

Looks Good Enough to Eat

Media Kids

Media literacy key concepts Introduction: What is media anyway?

Media literacy key concepts Lesson 2: Media are constructions

Media literacy key concepts Lesson 3: Audiences negotiate meaning

Media literacy key concepts Lesson 4: Media have commercial implications

Media literacy key concepts lesson 6: Each medium is a unique aesthetic form

Mirror Image

Put Downs

Stay on the Path Lesson Four: Scavenger Hunt

Stay on the Path Lesson One: Searching for Treasure

Stay on the Path Lesson Three: Treasure Maps

Stay on the Path Lesson Two: All That Glitters is Not Gold

Stereotyping and Bias

Taking Charge of TV Violence

The Anatomy of Cool

The Constructed World of Television Families

The Hero Project: Authenticating Online Information

TV Stereotypes

Understanding the Internet Lesson 4: Communication and Social Media

Villains, Heroes and Heroines

What’s in a Word?

You’ve Gotta Have a Gimmick

Licensed Resources

Passport to the Internet

Creating and Communicating

Apply oral language to explore and express ideas, communicate with others, and contribute as a member of a classroom community

Use the writing process to improve clarity

Express ideas thoughts, feelings, and opinions through various forms of communication

Employ a variety of communication forms according to audience and purpose

Create a variety of texts to explore self, family, and community

Apply language in creative and playful ways to develop, style, voice, artistry, and point of view

Recognize and use conventions and features of language

Create and communicate meaning by designing, editing, revising, refining, and presenting

MediaSmarts Resources

“He Shoots, He Scores”: Alcohol Advertising and Sports

Avatars and Body Image

Behaving Ethically Online: Ethics and Empathy

Comic Book Characters

Do You Believe This Camel?

Earth Day: Maps as Media

Elections and the Media

Game Time

Girls and Boys on Television

Healthy Food Web

Humour on Television

Introducing TV Families

Introduction to Ethics: Avatars and Identity

Kids, Alcohol and Advertising 1: Messages About Drinking

Kids, Alcohol and Advertising 2: Young Drinkers

Kids, Alcohol and Advertising 3: Understanding Brands

Looking at Food Advertising

Looks Good Enough to Eat

Media Kids

Media literacy key concepts lesson 6: Each medium is a unique aesthetic form

Prejudice and Body Image

Put Downs

Reporter For a Day

Stay on the Path Lesson One: Searching for Treasure

Teaching TV: Film Production: Who Does What?

The Anatomy of Cool

The Constructed World of Television Families

The Hero Project: Authenticating Online Information

Thinking Like a Tobacco Company: Grades 4-6

TV Stereotypes

Understanding the Internet Lesson 1: Using the Internet

Understanding the Internet Lesson 4: Communication and Social Media

Violence in Sports

What’s in a Word?

You’ve Gotta Have a Gimmick

Content

Students will know and understand the following Content:

a variety of fiction and non-fiction text types, including those of Canadian and Aboriginal origin

a variety of text genres including informational, personal, narrative, and imaginative

reading and metacognitive strategies before, during and after reading, to improve understanding and thinking

the impact of literary elements and devices

the writing process to enhance communication

a variety of communication forms, including oral, written, visual, and digital

the use of language to create a sense of voice and style

the structure, forms, features, and conventions of language

MediaSmarts Resources

Advertising All Around Us

Comparing Real Families to TV Families

Earth Day: Maps as Media

Freedom to Smoke

How to Analyze the News

Introducing TV Families

Junk Food Jungle

Kids, Alcohol and Advertising 1: Messages About Drinking

Kids, Alcohol and Advertising 2: Young Drinkers

Media literacy key concepts Introduction: What is media anyway?

Media literacy key concepts Lesson 2: Media are constructions

Media literacy key concepts Lesson 3: Audiences negotiate meaning

Media literacy key concepts Lesson 4: Media have commercial implications

Media literacy key concepts lesson 6: Each medium is a unique aesthetic form

Mirror Image

Prejudice and Body Image

Stereotyping and Bias

Taking Charge of TV Violence

The True Story

You’ve Gotta Have a Gimmick