Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III

In this section, you can find...

Initiated in 2000 by MediaSmarts, Young Canadians in a Wired World is the most comprehensive and wide-ranging study of its kind in Canada. The research project tracks and investigates the behaviours, attitudes, and opinions of Canadian children and youth with respect to their use of the Internet.

This report is drawn from a national survey of Canadian youth conducted by MediaSmarts in 2013. The classroom-based survey of 5,436 students in grades 4 through 11, in every province and territory, examined the role of networked technologies in young people’s lives. Encountering Racist and Sexist Content Online (the sixth in a series of reports from the survey) looks at how often Canadian youth are exposed to prejudice online, how it makes them feel and how they respond to it.

This report is drawn from a national survey of Canadian youth conducted by MediaSmarts in 2013. The classroom-based survey of 5,436 students in grades 4 through 11, in every province and territory, examined the role of networked technologies in young people’s lives. Sexuality and Romantic Relationships in the Digital Age (the fifth in a series of reports from the survey) examines issues such as sexting, romantic interactions online, and accessing pornography and information about sexuality.

This report is drawn from a national survey of Canadian youth conducted by MediaSmarts in 2013. The classroom-based survey of 5,436 students in grades 4 through 11, in every province and territory, examined the role of networked technologies in young people’s lives. Experts or Amateurs? Gauging Young Canadians’ Digital Literacy Skills (the fourth in a series of reports from the survey) explores the level of young people’s digital literacy skills, how they are learning these skills and how well digital technologies are being used in classrooms to support these skills.

This report is drawn from a national survey of Canadian youth conducted by MediaSmarts in 2013. The classroom-based survey of 5,436 students in grades 4 through 11, in every province and territory, examined the role of networked technologies in young people’s lives. Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats (the third in a series of reports from the survey) looks at youths’ experiences with online conflict, the strategies they use to deal with this and who they turn to for support.

This report is drawn from a national survey of Canadian youth conducted by MediaSmarts in 2013. The classroom-based survey of 5,436 students in grades 4 through 11, in every province and territory, examined the role of networked technologies in young people’s lives. Online Privacy, Online Publicity (the second in a series of reports from the survey) explores the Janus-faced nature of online privacy by examining the strategies that young people use to control how they are represented online and the ways in which they seek to assert some sort of control over their personal information. 

This report is drawn from a national survey of Canadian youth conducted by MediaSmarts in 2013. The classroom-based survey of 5,436 students in grades 4 through 11, in every province and territory, examined the role of networked technologies in young people’s lives. Life Online (the first in a series of reports from the survey) focuses on what youth are doing online, what sites they’re going to, their attitudes towards online safety, household rules on Internet use and unplugging from digital technologies.

This report sets out the findings of an exploratory qualitative research study that examined the attitudes and experiences of children, youth and parents relating to networked communications technologies.

This study explores the attitudes of Canadian teachers regarding networked technologies in classrooms: do they enhance learning and what is the impact on the teacher-student relationship? Results indicate that there are significant challenges to overcome in integrating technology in meaningful ways that enrich the learning process. A number of best practices are also identified.