I’ve recently become the chauffeur for my son and his group of friends, as they go to for a weekly gaming afternoon/hangout at one boy’s house. It’s clear that my role as the driver is to be invisible – they talk and goof around with each other in the car as if I’m not there, and if I do interject in their conversation, there’s a moment when they all freeze, confused as to where this voice from above came from, before ignoring it and carrying on. I’m there to hover on the outside, not to get involved.

Building on MediaSmarts’ findings on youth and privacy from our Young Canadians in a Wired World research, our new qualitative study, To Share or Not to Share: How Teens Make Privacy Decisions about Photos on Social Media examines the reasoning that teens apply when sharing photos online.

Video games are a big part of both boys’ and girls’ lives and they can be a very positive experience for kids and families.

A Guide for Trusted Adults is based on YWCA’s consultation with Canadian girls and young women about their concerns and the issues they face online and on social media platforms and the ways they want the adults in their lives to support them.

On the Loose: A Guide to Online Life for Post-Secondary Students supports young adults who are experiencing both new freedoms and challenges in their post- secondary life.

Your Online Resume

In this lesson, students learn that their online presence is like a resume that can help them – or hurt them – in their future personal and professional lives. The lesson begins by having students do a self-appraisal of their online resume. Students will review steps for limiting the negative impact of things they’ve posted online. Students then think about people whom they consider to be heroes or role models, identify the characteristics that make them admire these people, and discuss what those people did in order to be seen so positively. Finally, students learn tools and strategies for consciously building a positive online brand and develop a communications plan for doing so.

English

Welcome to the interactive game for children – Privacy Playground: The First Adventure of the Three CyberPigs. The purpose of this game is to teach eight-to-ten-year-old children how to surf safely on the Net, and particularly how to spot and navigate around Internet marketing ploys.

Welcome to the Teacher’s Guide for Jo Cool or Jo Fool, a tongue-in-cheek online module where students rate the decisions made by the brother and sister team of Joseph and Josie Cool as they encounter opportunities online, and learn a bit about safe and savvy surfing in the process.

Background information for parents and teachers for Privacy Pirates: An Interactive Unit on Online Privacy which introduces children, ages 7-9, to the concept of online privacy and teaches them to distinguish between information that is appropriate to give out and information better kept private – and to recognize how this may change in different contexts.

A Social Networking Workshop for Girls in Grades 7-9

This guide is designed to provide support to teachers,youth and community leaders when facilitating the Half Girl, Half Face workshop for girls.

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