Outcome Chart - British Columbia - Literacy Foundations - English Language Arts - Level 7

This outcome chart contains media-related learning outcomes from the British Columbia, Level 7, Literacy Foundations, English Language Arts curriculum, with links to supporting resources on the MediaSmarts site.

It is expected that students will:

Reading and Viewing

Specific Expectations

  • view and demonstrate an understanding of the meaning conveyed by a variety of visual media (e.g., broadcasts, web sites, videos, DVDs, visual components of print media such as tables, graphics, illustrations, graphic novels, art work, photographs)
  • before reading and viewing, make predictions about the content and meaning of texts (e.g., textbooks, brochures, newspaper, web site, fiction, non-fiction) by
    • interpreting a task and setting the purpose
    • generating guiding questions
    • accessing prior knowledge to make connections
    • previewing text features
  • during reading and viewing, construct meaning from texts by
  • analysing the significance of the themes and diverse points of view
  • differentiating between main ideas and supporting details
  • refining predictions and generating additional questions
  • using syntactic and context cues to guide and inform their understanding (e.g., use knowledge of grammar, word order, and sentence structure to guide and inform their understanding of the text)
  • using text features to locate information and support comprehension (e.g., diagrams, headings, bold and italicized words, table of contents)
  • recognizing literary elements and devices (e.g., plot, conflict, character, setting, climax, resolution, theme)
  • making inferences and drawing conclusions
  • making relevant notes using logical categories (e.g., outlines, mind maps, timelines)
  • examining and comparing ideas and elements within and among texts
  • identifying bias, contradictions, distortions, and non-represented perspectives
  • self-monitoring and self-correcting (e.g., identify when meaning-making is breaking down, reread to clarify understanding, use context cues and resources such as a dictionary to figure out unfamiliar vocabulary)
  • self-monitoring and self-correcting (e.g., review, identify when meaning-making is breaking down, use context cues and resources to figure out unfamiliar vocabulary)
  • using graphic organizers to process, record, and demonstrate synthesis of information
  • making inferences and drawing conclusions
  • summarizing, synthesizing, paraphrasing, and applying new ideas (e.g., suggest an alternative
  • approach or conclusion, consider alternative interpretations, extend the story)
  • reflecting on purpose for reading, predictions, and questions made during reading
  • transforming existing ideas and information (e.g., consider alternatives, outcomes, or developments beyond the text)
  • identifying the importance and impact of cultural, social, political, and historical contexts (e.g., identify majority and minority perspectives, discern multiple meanings of words based on context)
  • after reading and viewing, develop and monitor their understanding of the meaning conveyed in texts by

Lessons

Alcohol Myths

Beyond Media Messages: Media Portrayal of Global Development

Cinema Cops

Comic Book Characters

Cop Shows

Female Action Heroes

How to Analyze the News

Images of Learning: Elementary

Media Kids

News and Newspapers: Across the Curriculum

News Journalism Across the Media: Introduction

Perceptions of Race and Crime

Perceptions of Youth and Crime

Taking Charge of TV Violence

TV Dads: Immature and Irresponsible?

You’ve Gotta Have a Gimmick

Media Minute Lesson 3: Audiences negotiate meaning

Media Minute Lesson 4: Media have commercial implications

Media Minute Lesson 5: Media have social and political implications

Educational Games

Click if You Agree

MyWorld: A digital literacy tutorial for secondary students (Licensed Resource)

Passport to the Internet: Student tutorial for Internet literacy (Licensed Resource)