Saskatchewan - Outcome Chart - Communication Media

This outcome chart features links to MediaSmarts lessons and activities that support media-related learning objectives for Communication Media 10, 20, 30.

The purpose of Communication Media 10, 20, 30 is to provide experiences for students to inquire while developing understanding, skills, and abilities in audio, video, and interactive media production to communicate effectively. Areas of Focus identify the key components of what students are expected to know, understand and be able to do upon completion of the learning in a Practical and Applied Arts (PAA) curriculum. Because the PAA curricula generally contain more learning than one course (1 credit), the Areas of Focus are not meant to be fully attainable after 100 hours of learning. The Areas of Focus for Communication Media are to:

  • Explore and experience fundamental concepts through the acquisition and improvement of technical skills including appropriate software, and equipment use, terminology, and teamwork.
  • Create solutions to problems or challenges using a variety of production skills including project management.
  • Identify communication issues and implications for self, society, and the environment, as well as plan projects considering sustainability.
  • Identify career opportunities as well as skills, work habits, and training required to obtain and sustain work in communication media.
  • Understand and utilize the three stages of production.

Saskatchewan Education (2010)
Communication Media Curriculum Guide

Communication Through Media

Overall Expectations

Identify various roles and influences of communication media in school and society

Specific Expectations

  1. Discuss and clarify the purposes for communication media including established examples such as video, audio, and interactive media and emerging examples such as blogs, wikis, social networking, and multiple platforms.
  2. Identify and explain a communications model which includes aspects such as the message, the sender, the mode of transmission, the receiver, and any interactivity.
  3. Describe specific examples where there is emphasis on communication in society (e.g., school, community, home).
  4. Provide some judgement of and justification for effective communications processes and practices (e.g., ads, business, embedded media).

 

MediaSmarts Resources

Lessons

Bias and Crime in Media

Bias in News Sources

Broadcasting Codes

Celebrities and World Issues

Cinema Cops

Comparing Crime Dramas

Crime in the News

Crime Perceptions Quiz

Diversity and Media Ownership

Don’t Drink and Drive: Assessing the Effectiveness of Anti-Drinking Campaigns

Gender Messages in Alcohol Advertising

How to Analyze the News

Magazine Production

Miscast and Seldom Seen

News Journalism Across the Media: Summative Activities

News Journalism: Definitions and Comments about the News

News Journalism: Radio News

Online Propaganda and the Proliferation of Hate

Perceptions of Youth and Crime

Political Cartoons

Shaking the Movers: Youth Rights and Media

Television News

The Citizen Reporter

The Front Page

Watching the Elections

Who’s Telling My Story?

You Be the Editor

Legal and Ethical Issues

Overall Expectations

Investigate and articulate legal issues related to media such as copyright, privacy, and consent.

Specific Expectations

a. Define the term “copyright” in relation to Canadian law and assess its impact on a Communication Media class.

b. Describe the three factors that place some works in the public domain and cite some examples of these works along with reasons for their inclusion.

c. Investigate and report on current issues and resources connected to copyright law such as “open source”, “creative commons”, and stock resources.

d. Investigate and report on the need for consent in various circumstances such as location, appearance, material, and music.

MediaSmarts Resources

Lessons

Up, Up and Away? (TM)

Interactive Resources

Click if You Agree

MyWorld (licensed resource)

Overall Expectations

Discuss and reflect on the need for societal standards (e.g., legal, ethical, and community norms, and values) and cultural sensitivity in media.

Specific Expectations

a. Formulate a list of societal standards in relation to issues including sexism, racism, and homophobia and support the list with positive media examples.

b. Compose a strategy for inclusion of appropriate language, content, and images reflective of societal standards in personal, class, and school projects and assignments.

c. Identify and discuss various rating systems for media such as television, movies, and games.

d. Identify and discuss some issues regarding posting of images on the web including safety, possible consequences, and permanence of web postings.

MediaSmarts Resources

Lessons

Bias

Bias in News Sources

Broadcasting Codes

Challenging Hate Online

Crime Perceptions Quiz

Diversity and Media Ownership

First Person

Free Speech and the Internet

Gender Messages in Alcohol Advertising

Hate 2.0

Hate or Debate

Marketing to Teens: Gender Roles in Advertising

Online Propaganda and the Proliferation of Hate

Perceptions of Youth and Crime

Scapegoating and Othering

Television Broadcast Ratings

The Citizen Reporter

Thinking about Hate

Violence on Film: The Ratings Game

What Students Need to Know about Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy

Who Knows? Your Privacy in the Information Age

Interactive Resources

Click if You Agree

MyWorld (licensed resource)

Overall Expectations

Identify through research the positive and negative aspects of creative, artistic, and intellectual works receiving ownership protection.

Specific Expectations

a. Utilize the Canadian Intellectual Property Office to distinguish between copyright, a patent, and an industrial design and identify some common examples

c. Explain and support a personal stance on intellectual property.

MediaSmarts Resources

Lessons

Up, Up and Away? (TM)

Interactive Resources

MyWorld (licensed resource)

Preproduction Processes

Overall Expectations

Clearly articulate and demonstrate an understanding of the preproduction process.

Specific Expectations

a. Identify and explain effective strategies to create the production elements during preproduction such as creating the production, determining the intention, identifying the content, predicting the audience effect, creating a treatment, writing a script, and making a storyboard.

b. Identify types of hardware and software used in media communications and explain how they are used effectively to produce communications.

c. Apply critical thinking and decision making regarding the relationship among the production intention, the target audience, and the technology format.

MediaSmarts Resources

Lessons

Bias and Crime in Media

Buy Nothing Day

Camera Shots

Celebrities and World Issues

Don’t Drink and Drive: Assessing the Effectiveness of Anti-Drinking Campaigns

Images of Learning

Magazine Production

Making Media for Democratic Citizenship

Marketing to Teens: Marketing Tactics

News Journalism Across the Media: Summative Activities

Promoting Ethical Behaviour Online: Our Values and Ethics

The Blockbuster Movie

The Privacy Dilemma: Lesson Plan for Senior Classrooms

Thinking Like a Citizen

Video Production of a Newscast

Video Production

Overall Expectations

Develop and demonstrate increasing skill through the practice and use of equipment (e.g., camera, lights) and processes (e.g., camera work, set lighting) during the typical steps of the production stage of shooting video and beginning postproduction.

Specific Expectations

a. Identify the key components of a video camera and explain the function of each as well as the benefits of turning off the automatic settings for the camera.

b. Identify various video formats and explain their current general usage.

c. Identify and demonstrate industry standard practices of video camera use for positioning (e.g., eye level, high and low angles, point of view), framing (e.g., wide shot, close-up, two shot), movement (e.g., tilt, pan, zoom), and depth of field.

d. Discuss the purposes of lighting in a video and reasons why different lighting would be used (e.g., mood, clarity of images).

e. Demonstrate an understanding of motivated lighting effects such as ambient, manipulated, one, two, and three-point lighting.

f. Understand and explain the challenges for the recording of audio in a single system video production.

g. Demonstrate postproduction techniques by editing video shot to complete a simple cut such as an entrance or exit cut.

MediaSmarts Resources

Lessons

Bias and Crime in Media

Buy Nothing Day

Camera Shots

Celebrities and World Issues

Magazine Production

Making Media for Democratic Citizenship

News Journalism Across the Media: Summative Activities

Promoting Ethical Behaviour Online: Our Values and Ethics

The Privacy Dilemma: Lesson Plan for Senior Classrooms

Video Production of a Newscast

Overall Expectations

Develop, refine, and appraise personal skills and understandings acquired in Module 6A while experimenting with postproduction activities.

Specific Expectations

a. Refine storyboarding techniques used in Module 5 to plan shots for video to include transition techniques.

b. Correctly apply common industry terminology such as fade in, fade out, action safe, title safe, reverse angle, voice over, cut to, and over the shoulder.

c. Critique the composition of some sample videos looking for examples of techniques that add interest to shots such as adding depth, and the rule of thirds.

d. Frame faces to create interest for the viewer by applying the rule of thirds, using correct headroom and nose room.

e. Experiment with motivated lighting effects to gain an understanding of how light is used effectively.

f. Discuss and demonstrate the differences between transitional devices such as dissolves and cuts.

g. Demonstrate increasing skill in editing by completing various shot-to-shot transitions such as an entrance cut, an exit cut, and an action cut.

h. Create a personal assessment of acquired skills and understandings to share with the instructor.

MediaSmarts Resources

Lessons

Camera Shots

Magazine Production

Making Media for Democratic Citizenship

News Journalism Across the Media: Summative Activities

The Privacy Dilemma: Lesson Plan for Senior Classrooms

Video Production of a Newscast

Interactive Media

Overall Expectations

Develop and demonstrate skill to create and produce interactive media.

Specific Expectations

a. Use a variety of planning techniques (e.g., research, design briefs, task lists, mock-ups, storyboards, site maps) to design an interactive media project such as web pages, social media, or a blog.

b. Use application software and equipment to perform a variety of production tasks (e.g., inputting, manipulating, and outputting audio; embedding and linking graphics; posting media on the Internet).

MediaSmarts Resources

Lessons

First Person

Making Media for Democratic Citizenship

The Citizen Reporter

The Privacy Dilemma: Lesson Plan for Senior Classrooms

Overall Expectations

Create and assess interactive media using multiple platforms.

Specific Expectations

a. Use a variety of effective planning techniques to create a media project complete with a management plan.

b. Collaborate on creation of a unique messaging project involving more than one media format.

c. Employ software to increase personal skills and abilities to communicate effectively.

d. Create a self-assessment of acquired skills based on given criteria.