Background information for parents and teachers for Privacy Pirates: An Interactive Unit on Online Privacy which introduces children, ages 7-9, to the concept of online privacy and teaches them to distinguish between information that is appropriate to give out and information better kept private – and to recognize how this may change in different contexts.

The purpose of this workshop is to provide tweens and young teens with strategies and knowledge that will help them respect themselvesrespect others and respect the space when using social media.

Understanding what kids are doing on social networks can be challenging – even if parents are on many of the same platforms.

A Social Networking Workshop for Girls in Grades 7-9

This guide is designed to provide support to teachers,youth and community leaders when facilitating the Half Girl, Half Face workshop for girls.

Give your kids the guidance they need.

MediaSmarts is pleased to announce that we have partnered with Instagram and Connect Safely to launch a Parents’ Guide to Instagram to help prepare you to give your kids the guidance they need.

When you react the right way to cyberbullying you can turn things around

Ask yourself:

  • Am I letting things go because I don’t think I can do anything to help? Actually, what you do is super important. What witnesses do about bullying is actually one of the most important factors in how much someone is hurt by it and can go a long way in building positive online spaces.

Not reacting to cyberbullying can hurt as much as cyberbullying

Ask yourself:

  • Am I hoping that someone else will do something so I don’t have to? A lot of people are reluctant to take action, but did you know that almost three-quarters of kids who’ve witnessed cyberbullying did something about it? If that surprises you, it may be because a lot of the things we can do to help – like speaking privately to the person who’s being mean, or letting the person who’s being targeted know you care about them – don’t happen in public. 

What starts as a joke can end up hurting someone

Lots of times kids will say they’re not bullying, they’re ‘just joking’ – in fact, it’s the number one reason for being mean online. Other times, people will play down how serious the situation really is.

Some reactions hurt more than you think

Before you react, ask yourself:

  • Am I letting things go because I’m worried about making things worse for the person being targeted? Some things we do when we witness cyberbullying – even when we’re trying to help – can make things worse, so it’s always a good idea to step back and think about the situation before jumping in. 

For more than twenty-five years, Canadian teachers have been at the forefront of getting students online and preparing them to use the Internet in safe, wise and responsible ways. Thanks to the SchoolNet program in the 1990s, many young Canadians had their first experiences with networked technologies in their classrooms and school libraries. However, MediaSmarts’ recent Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III study shows that even now, our so-called “digital natives” still need guidance from their teachers.

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